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yeperu

noun; blending
a more lively yes. The word yeparu came out of me because I wanted to say yes but in a more lively fashion. The -aru ending could be spelled many ways but the main image I have after I said the word was of a kangaroo. And lively could be connected with the metaphoric bouncingness (neologism) of life. To pursue furthur, the bounciness of a kangaroo gives the word yeparu (I like this spelling because it is shorter than yeparoo) a more lively feel than yep. Yep is also a more lively term than yes, but I wanted to push the degree a little further. word origin of kangaroo. When Captain Cook came to Queensland, Australia, in 1770, he naturally asked about the strange leaping animal. He then called it the kangaroo. There is no such native name; the native words, also used in Eng., are wallaby for the small species and wallaroo for the large —perhaps, originally, expressions of surprise. It is suggested that the Captain's word, kangaroo, is a misunderstanding and corruption of the native words for "I don't understand you."
 
Did you finish your homework?" me: "yeparu.
Etymology : Old English yep + (I pasted the origin of kangaroo from the "Dictionary of Word Origins." Book by Joseph T. Shipley; Philosophical Library, 1945) below
Source : me (Kurt Pessa)
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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