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Impeach

verb
To remove anyone from their office or position. Impeach underwent metonomy from the real meaning of the word, to vote to see whether there should be a trial on whether or not an official should be removed to simply meaning the possible end result of being removed.
 
“Did you hear that Blake got kicked out of office?” “Yea he got impeached.”
Etymology : Impeach from late 14c., "to impede, hinder, prevent," from Anglo-French empecher, Old French empeechier "hinder" (12c., Modern French empêcher), from Late Latin impedicare "to fetter, catch, entangle," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + Latin pedica "shackle," frompes (genitive pedis) "foot." Sense of "accuse a public officer of misconduct" first recorded 1560s, perhaps via confusion with Latin impetere"attack, accuse." Related: Impeached; impeaching. (etymonline)
Source : Heard while drafting McMurtry Constitution July 2013.
Last modified: 25 November 2013


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