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ginger

a person that can be described as having pale skin, red hair, and freckles It's interesting, because this word is quite popular now, but has absolutely no origin or relation to its meaning. More…

ginobili'd

(past participle form; eponymy) charged with a foul in a basketball game after a player on the opposing team intentionally falls over to make it seem as if (s)he was run into =Manu More…

ginormo

marked by an extremely large or great size, number or extent =The adjective ‘gigantic,’ which has been clipped to ‘gi,’ and the adjective ‘enormous,’ which has been clipped to ‘normous,’ More…

Ginormous

Extremely great in size or power. In this case, “enormous” and “gigantic” are doublets, one from Latin and one from Greek, respectively. “Ginormous” More…

ginormous

Extremely large. Apparently refers to the large magnitude of savings that the store is offering as people go about their Christmas shopping. It seems to be a blend or either giant and More…

Ginormous

Referring to something exceptionally large. It was probably created when she was in a rush to try and say something that was excessively large and ended up thinking of two words to say at More…

ginormous

very very large. Used to describe something very very large. Formed by combining gigantic and enormous. =then this ginormous guy got in my face. Etymology : Blending and Clipping of More…

ginormous

characterized by extremely large proportions, bigger than normal size This is a fairly popular word used to describe something that is exceptionally large. It is used to add extra emphasis More…

ginormous

Huge, enormous To use a different word to emphasize the hugeness of whatever one is describing. =I’ve got a ginormous headache. Etymology : Blend formed by roots giant, enormous More…

Ginormous

Extremely great in size or power Apparent meaning, etymology, and type of word formation: The word means extremely large in size, power, etc. “Ginormous” is formed by clipping More…

GINORMOUS

Of immense quantity beyond what is normally seen. The speaker was trying to convey her overwhelming desire, and thus no single word would adequately capture it. By blending two words, she More…

ginormous

Extremely large in size In class, we discussed the playful nature of American English speakers. The adjective big is so common that it is very susceptible to be expanded upon. Also, the More…

ginormous

bigger than enormous For the word formation, I selected compounding because to be a blend, it needs to share letters in common, but there is no correlation between gigantic and enormous. More…

Ginormous

Extremely large. Ginormous is a word formed by the clipping and blending of the words gigantic and enormous. The overall effect is to create a new adjective with more emphasis than the two More…

ginormous

very large in size Etymology : blend – enormous/gigantic =said by 9 yr old to his 5 yr old cousin about dinosaurs

Ginormous

Extremely large. This one was came from my girl friend, and she uses it quite a bit. The example that I kept came from when she went to this party where there was a chocolate fountain that More…

GINORMOUS

extremely large =Oh my! It is not gigantic. It is ginormous! Etymology : blend of gigantic and enormous =Conversation

ginormous

Extremely large. It was used to describe anything extremely large, requiring the use of two words to describe an object as humongous, but combining them into one word for ease of saying. More…

Ginormous

Of incredibly large size. to place extra emphasis on the largeness of a certain object. The word itself sounds kind of funny/ridiculous. =Ahhhh, it’s ginormous! Etymology : More…

Ginormous

Ginormous is a combination of gigantic and enormous and it means roughly the same thing as both of those words. It is used to describe something that is large and huge. Both blended words More…


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