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Intuite

verb; back formation
To know or figure out without any thinking or cognitive process. To understand or know something instinctively.
 
“Intuition” is a common word but its formation is from the Latin intuitus. There is no English root for “intuition” but using a back formation one would get a word like “intute.” This back formation is formed by dropping the “ion” from intuition to form a root like “intuite.” As with most back formation, the speaker of this was probably just following a common pattern in English in which adding an “ion” denotes a change from a verb to noun. For example, “construct” and “construction.” In this case, “intuite” is back formed from “intuition” which is a novel formation because intuition came first and is not from a root like “intuite.” “Intuition” came into the language as just that and back formation has given rise to “intuite.”
Etymology : Back formation from “intuition” to form “intuite.”
Source : “How did you know that? Did you just intuite it?” - College student at Rice University. Sept. 2010.
Last modified: 8 December 2010


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