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mealing

noun; derivation
A noun describing the degree at which a restaurant serves its meals. (See discussion for more information) This word was innovated while discussing a local restaurant, Chipotle. O. P., Jeffrey N., and Justin N. were discussing where to go and eat on the evening of November 28. O.P. suggested Chipotle because neither Justin N. nor Jeffrey N. had been before. After describing the restaurant Jeffrey N. said something to the effect of, “Well, I don’t really want a meal, I have already ate.” To which O.P. replied, “They don’t really have much mealing there.” To which Justin N. replied, “Mealing? I should use that for my Word Journal project.” And here we are. The word was not formed for humor, but was formed to shortcut the point that O.P. wanted to make. O.P. wanted to indicate that Chipotle was not quite as formal as a sit-down restaurant, so one could eat there without necessarily getting a full meal. The term “mealing” was coined to describe the degree at which Chipotle offered its meals. Higher mealing implies a sit-down restaurant with different courses (Olive Garden, for example), whereas lower mealing implies a restaurant that serves snacks or single-serving items (say, Starbucks). Chipotle is on the lower end of this scale. It is ambiguous whether or not this word was formed as a derivation or blend. The “-ing” suffix is usually reserved for verbs, but here it is used as a noun. It may be that this word is a blend of “meal” with a similar word like “dining”.
 
They don’t really have much mealing there.
Etymology : meal from Middle English mele, from Old English mæl; + -ing¬ “action, process or art” from Middle English, from Old English -ung, -ing
Source : O. P
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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