Navigation


Voterate

verb; analogy
To vote, especially on an important, landmark decision in policy “Voterate” means to vote, and thereby express one’s opinion regarding an idea for a poll. Two possible etymologies exist: a) voter-ate: in which the “-ate” suffix has been attached to the noun “voter”. The verb forming suffix “-ate” comes from the Middle English suffix –aten, which in turn was derived from the Latin past participle ending –atus, meaning ‘to cause to be modified or affected by.’ The word “voter” comes from the stem change vōt- from the Latin verb vovōre ‘to vow, to desire,’ and the suffix “-er” was attached to “vote” to indicate ‘one who (votes).’ In this case the word formation is an analogy to such words as “levitate” and “associate”, taking the suffix and placing it on a different word. In addition, the word “voter” changed its part of speech when the verb forming suffix was added. b) vote-ter-ate, in which the “te” from “vote” and “ter” have been blended together. In this etymology, the “ter” could come from blending and clipping the word “exterminate” in which the letters “ter,” not a typical nor meaningful morpheme, as it is used in “voterate” but perhaps this clipping carried the idea of strength and power coming from a word such as “exterminate” and became an infix. Although this formation seems strange, it would explain the more subtle connotations coming from “voterate” that suggest powerful, sweeping change. Possible reason used: In this particular case the Hanszen Cabinet was voting on a new policy which would result in sweeping changes in allowing clubs to meet in the Hanszen commons when other Hanszenites want to study. Most likely the president wanted a stronger word than simply “vote” to indicate the big change that would occur as a result of approving the new policy. “Voterate” shares similarity in form to words like “exonerate” and “exterminate."
 
I move to approve the new policy for our upper commons. Let’s voterate!
Etymology : [analogy formation from root “vote(r)” > L. vovōre + “-ate” > ME –aten, < L. –atus]
Source : friend
Last modified: 10 June 2008


Navigation

# $ & ( + - 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 @
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z [ a ab c e f g u v




Options