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Rollercoaster

verb; zero derivation
To go to amusement parks and enjoy riding roller coasters Apparent meaning, etymology, and type of word formation: “Rollercoaster” means to go to amusement parks and enjoy riding roller coasters. This is a prime example of zero derivation, as well as compounding a word. In this case by process of synecdoche, the word for a single amusement park ride, a specific roller coaster, has been extended to stand for the entire process of visiting an amusement park as a whole, as well as enjoying the experience of all roller coaster rides. Although this word was only heard, and therefore those present cannot be sure whether the new verb is actually one word or two, the sense of the word, indicating a single, unified action (enjoying the experience of roller coasters) suggests that this new verb is a single word. The noun “roller coaster” comes from combining the two words “roller” and “coaster.” “Roller” was formed by analogy adding the suffix “-er” (one who/ that which) to the verb “roll” which came from Old French roler, roller, rouler, and Latin rotulâre, from rotula, diminutive of rota, meaning ‘wheel’. “Coaster” was formed by adding the suffix “-er” to “coast”, from Middle English costey-en, from Old French costei-er and Romanic type cost-ic-âre, from costa ‘rib, side, coast.’ Possible reason used: Using “roller coaster” as a verb more concisely and directly expresses the idea of going to amusement parks and enjoying the rides there, and also more directly highlights the aspects of going to an amusement park to which the speaker wishes to refer. For ease of understanding the idea, the speaker most eloquently summed up the idea of going to amusement parks and enjoying the thrill of scary rides all in one word.
 
Do you rollercoaster?
Etymology : zero derivation from “roller coaster”; “roller”: “roll” OF roler, roller, rouler, L rotulâre, < rotula, dim. of rota, ‘wheel’ + “-er” ‘that which’, and “coaster” ME costey-en < OF costei-er, Romanic type cost-ic-âre, from costa ‘rib, side, coast.’
Source : friend
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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