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Lintorrific

adjective; blending and clipping
Containing extremely large amounts of fuzz. (‘the lintorrific shirt’) Apparent meaning, etymology, and type of word formation: “Lintorrific” means covered with little spots of fuzz. The word is made from the root “lint” coming from Middle English linnet indicating the fuzz from small, soft fibers that have separated from the fabric. The word “lint” is also related indirectly to the word “line.” The suffix “-ic” means ‘making’ or ‘causing’ and comes from Middle French -fique and Latin -ficus, from facere meaning ‘to make.’ However, a more likely etymology of the word suggests the coiner employed clipping and blending by taking the ending from the word “horrific” (having the power to cause painful and intense fear), which came from the Middle English horrour, from Middle French horror, from Latin, action of bristling, from horrēre to bristle. Admittedly an unusual association, the power behind such a word as “lintorrific” suggests its morphemes come from a powerful word such as horrific. Possible reason used: The coiner wanted to express the tremendous amount of lint present on his shirt and by combining with the word “horror,” the word conveys the extreme fuzz quantities on the shirt.
 
My shirt is lintorrific!
Etymology : [clipping and blending “lint” ME linnet + “horror” < ME horrour < Middle F. horror, from L, action of bristling, from horrēre to bristle + “-ic” Middle F. -fique and L. -ficus, < facere ‘to make’]
Source : friend
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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