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Indie

adjective; clipping
artistic creations outside the commercial mainstream, without the support of a major record label, major movie studio, or other source of a large budget Ever the hipsters, teens and young adults love creating words for their independent lifestyles. When the new craze in the music and movie world became the ‘non-mainstream’ bands and directors, what better word could epitomize them than the word these teens craved for themselves, independent? Obviously, calling something independent was not as cool as shortening it, making it more hip. Thus independent was clipped, and indie became the word to describe these (now mainstream) non-mainstream bands and movies. The word didn’t come into popular usage until around 2003-2004, when huge hits such as Napoleon Dynamite became surprisingly trendy, almost overnight. That was when this neologism became the ‘brand name’ for this style. It also got applied to music, referring to those bands who didn’t use a big name production company yet still managed to get CDs out and circulated. This term has definitely broadened since it first started being used, as now it refers to almost anything non-mainstream. People can even live ‘indie lifestyles’. Ironically, the word is now starting to divide the group of people who created it. Those who like the indie scene see the word as a flag to rally to, while those who don’t care for it generally toss it around like a dirty word. If something isn’t good, then it is bound to be one of those damn indie creations.
 
These indie bands are intense!
Etymology : Clipped from the word independent. From Latin in- + French dependant
Source : Friend
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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