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drop the track

verb; slang; folk etymology
To release a track to be available for listening. The term is typically used by musicians who will release music for listeners who are then available to listen and critique the work. A slightly slang term, musicians will not literally "drop" the track, but rather release the music, via the Internet or otherwise.
 
"I can't wait for Drake to drop this new track on us."
Etymology : Comes from the Old English term dropian "to fall vertically" 14th century. "the track" typically refers to a song, off an album or mixtape likewise. To "drop" in "drop the track" is not to literally drop a song on the listeners, but rather to release it to the public.
Source : online forum, September 2013
Last modified: 25 November 2013


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