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word(2)

interjection; other word formation type Semantic change. Common usage of word as an indicator of a written word changes to using word as a replacement for "Okay" or "I agree". Could be example of zero derivation, because common "word" is a noun and this acts as an interjection. An example of polysemy.
General agreement with a statement or command that is very informal. Can be a replacement for the common interjection, "Okay", which conveys a similar meaning when used in the same way. In addition to agreement it can be a an affirmation that something was said appropriately or correctly, as a form of validation of the statement.
 
"Word, I think that's a great idea, I'll go start right now."
Etymology : From Proto-Indo-European (PIE) *were, meaning speak or say. From Proto-Germanic *wurdan, developed from many descendant languages such as Old Saxon/Old Frisian, word, Dutch, woord, Old High German, wort, or Old Norse oro. Old English used it as word to mean speech, talk, utterance, or word.
Source : Friend, Rice University, November 17, 2013
Last modified: 26 November 2013


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