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slay

verb; other word formation type none; sematic change of an Old English word
to succeed in doing something; to do a task extremely well
 
The word slay originates from the Old English word slean which meant ‘to smite, strike, beat.’ In the late ninth century, slay shifted to mean ‘to kill with a weapon.’ Based off of this meaning of slay, it is currently used to describe someone who “killed it,” a term that arose in the 1980s and gained prominence around 2010, by doing or performing something impressively. If a person killed it in that outfit, it means that they looked very impressive or good-looking, and it can be said that their outfit slayed. http://www.oed.com.ezproxy.rice.edu/view/Entry/103361?rskey=K6T8Lb&result=5&isAdvanced=false#eid
Etymology : This term is not exactly a new word and therefore has no word formation type, but it is instead a semantic change for the Old English word slean meaning ‘to smite, strike, beat’ that later meant ‘to kill with a weapon, slaughter.’
Source : "15 Times Lady Gaga’s Outfits Slayed on ‘American Horror Story: Hotel’” – Buzzfeed (Nov 11, 2015)
Last modified: 12 December 2015


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