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Yeet

other word formation type Verb
To leave hastily; abandon
 
‘Yeet’ is usually used in relation to an event that the speaker does not want to attend. Therefore, the noun with which it is used may be seen in a negative light, because the speaker must have a reason to skip out on whatever he or she is talking about. When used in the present tense, ‘yeet’ is followed by the word ‘on’. However, in the past tense, the verb does not include ‘on’. Thus, “I need to yeet on out of here” turns into “I yeeted out of there” in the past tense. This is a very peculiar irregularity that does not seem to be common in English. Other verbs that are accompanied with ‘on’ in the present tense also use it in the past (e.g. “sit on” and “sat on”; “tell on” and “told on”). The reason for this characteristic is unclear. Perhaps ‘on’ is taken out because of the extra syllable in ‘yeeted’, thus preventing accumulation of too many syllables. This makes sense because many new changes in English are made for the sake of brevity.
Etymology : The etymology of ‘yeet’ is unclear; there are no obvious indications of its history
Source : “I told my friend I was gonna yeet on out of class on Wednesday” said by my friend on November 16, 2016
Last modified: 30 November 2016


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