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Drunch

blending and clipping Noun
Drunch is a blend of the words “drinking” and “lunch.” It is primarily used as a noun in place of the word “lunch.” An example is “Let’s get drunch.” It means to get drinks at lunch. However, the meaning has shifted over time. Drunch can now mean: to consume excessive quantities of alcohol at lunch, or to get drunk at lunch. An example of this usage would be: “We got so drunch, yesterday.” This definition often leads to a folk etymology, where people see the word as a blend of “drunk” and “lunch.”
 
In the contexts that I have heard it being used in, it serves an almost euphemistic purpose. When in a public setting where anyone could be listening, someone will use drunch as a way of letting their friend know they got drunk without announcing it to the world. It is viewed as a more polite way of telling someone you either want to get drunk at lunch (Let’s go get drunch) or that you got drunk at a previous lunch (Yesterday, I got so drunch). I’m sure brunch provided an analogical model for the formation of drunch. The resemblance to brunch also helps conceal the meaning in public. If you were talking with a friend and used the word drunch, a passerby, particularly an older individual, would probably assume they heard the word brunch.
Etymology : Blend formed initially by combining the words drinking and lunch.
Source : “Let’s get drunch” (Patriot’s Day movie, September 2017)
Last modified: 28 November 2017


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