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yeet (2)

  1. sound symbolism; interjection
    Used as an expression of excitement, victory, or joy, typically in a colloquial setting. It is often used after someone receives a piece of good news that they were not expecting.
     
    The word yeet was probably meant to only be a nonce term coined to describe the specific dance move mentioned above. The person who coined this term likely felt that there was no existing word that could describe the dance move and thus created his own. Somehow, through the spread of the word from Vine to across the internet, the term picked up its current meaning, although there is no formal record of how this happened.
    Etymology : Yeet is its own root. The first recorded source of yeet is in a 2014 Vine where a boy was doing a sweeping dance motion that was called the “yeet.” However, it seems the current meaning of the word has strayed far from its original meaning, as no one uses the term to describe a dance move anymore.
    Source : Friend 1: “Hey, the deadline for the homework got pushed back to next Friday.” Friend 2: “Yeet!” (In person. 10-22-19)
  2. sound symbolism; verb
    To throw, hurl, or move something, typically with a lot of force, quickly, or with a high altitude. This action is often accompanied by the person simultaneously screaming the word as an interjection. Sometimes it can also be applied to the action of a person moving quickly away from or leaving an uncomfortable situation. Again, this term is usually used in a colloquial setting.
     
    See above
    Etymology : See above
    Source : Powderpuff Coach: “When you have the chance, just yeet that ball out of here.” (Speaking to the quarterback about passing the ball) (In person. 10-19-19) Friend: “When I saw him come in, I yeeted myself out of there real quick.” (Speaking of a professor whom he is afraid of) (In person. 9-26-19)
Last modified: 6 December 2019


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