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hundo

clipping; noun
Used as an informal way of saying hundred. Often followed by the word percent, it is most often used in a joking manner or to express excitement. Hundo is also used to refer to the hundred-dollar bill. However, hundo is typically found in its plural form, hundos, when used with this definition.
 
Although the exact origins of hundo is unknown, it is believed that it comes from the simultaneous blending and clipping of hundred and dollar. This could explain why there is an o at the end of hundo (coming from the do in dollar). If that is the case, then hundo has also gone through broadening, where it went from specifically meaning the hundred-dollar bill to its now more general meaning of one hundred. The person who coined this term likely wanted a silly way of expressing the hundred-dollar bill. The sound of a word ending in o likely sounded silly, and the term was created.
Etymology : Clipping of the word hundred, which comes from Proto-Germanic hunda-ratha-, meaning “hundred number.” In Old English, the word hundred was just hund. Hundo is merely a clipping of the word hundred, and it only came into popular usage in the past one or two years.
Source : Friend: “He pulled out a fat stack hundos on my birthday, and I thought it was for me.” Me: “Was it not?” Friend: “No, he took it to the bank instead.” (In person. 11-27-2019)
Last modified: 6 December 2019


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