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Misclass (2)

noun; clipping; zero derivation
A phrase that when taken out of context can act as a sexual double-entendre or innuendo, but the phrase must not be an intentional double-entendre or innuendo.
 
In conversation, if one were to say any phrase that could be taken as an innuendo such as “stick it in,” without realizing that they are stating an innuendo, then that phrase is considered a “misclass” in the M.O.B. of Rice University. This statement is then quoted, and its speaker is credited with the misclass on the weekly M.O.B. newsletter.
Etymology : The word seems to come from “misclassified,” meaning to place an object into the wrong category. This meaning was applied similarly to be a sexual phrase applied in a normal situation, or words that could be taken out of context to be for a sexual situation. This was clipped to become “misclass,” and the meaning changed to the current definition. Thus, the phrase would be a “misclass” since the term is being used in a non-sexual manner even though it may seem to be overtly sexual.
Source : “Misclass: ‘Now stick it in’ – Charles Dyall.”- M.O.B. Newsletter, 11/17/19 (Was referring to projector power cord in context)
Last modified: 11 December 2019


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