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Flaw

adverb metaphor; other word formation type
a word used to describe someone’s action or a situation as morally incorrect and against principles
 
This term originated in the Northeast of the United States, specifically in New York as it is a term that is most familiar with people from New York. It is no longer a very popular word and has not spread past the northeast. It is rare to hear someone from the South using this word.
Etymology : The original definition of flaw does not use flaw as an adverb. Flaw is originally a word that is either a verb or a noun. From Middle English, flaw has meant to be “a flake of snow” or “a spark of fire”. In addition, flaw originates from Old Norse as a “stone slab, layer of stone”. As a verb, flaw has meant to “cause a shortcoming or imperfection”. It may be due to this definition that flaw has gained a new definition. There maty have been a need for a word that describes someone’s actions that are completely wrong.
Source : “You didn’t know she was coming? That’s flaw”. Text message conversation with sister. 10/21/2019.
Last modified: 12 December 2019


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