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KILLDOZE

verb; back formation
To take out one's frustration in a dramatic and destructive way. (I'm going to killdoze city hall if they don't start helping out our neighborhood.') The speaker wanted to express his frustration. The killdozer incident is an excellent example of a frustrated man taking out his frustration. So the speaker referred to this metaphorically in expressing his own frustration. Additionally, the speaker reanalyzed the word to make it a verb by removing the '-er', which is a common suffix used with verbs to make them nouns. It is clearly a metaphor to the killdozer incident, in which a man destroyed part of a town out of frustration with the government. It is also apparently a back formation. Instead of being seen as a blend of 'kill' and 'bulldozer', it is now seen as the root 'killdoze' with the '-er' suffix, meaning 'one who killdozes' or 'thing which killdozes'.
 
“One of these days, I'm going to killdoze this whole place.”
Etymology : [Back formation and metaphorical extension of 'killdozer' to more general situations than the specific incident (see previous entry)]
Source : Conversation with a friend
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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