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Ease

adjective; zero derivation
(of a task) So easily accomplished that one does not bother putting forth the effort to accomplish the task. The word was coined to provide justification for laziness. If one wants to avoid doing something one can say “Too ease, why even bother?” It is not clear whether the term “ease” came from the noun and verb forms of “ease” or from the word “easy.” If the former is true, “ease” was created through zero derivation. If the latter is true, “ease” was created through a combination of clipping the word “easy,” and then making an orthographic change so that the term resembled a previously existing word.
 
I could study for my test right now, but that would be too ease.
Etymology : Monomorphemic. Etymology sketchy. Middle English ese, from Old French aise comfort, or maybe Middle English esy, from Old French aaisié (past participle of aaisier to ease.
Source : conversation with friend
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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