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Slackademic

noun; blending
A student who prefers the safety and comfort of academic life over the trials and tribulations of the real world This word was probably coined to describe the growing number of students who don’t know what to do after school. As time progresses, more and more post-college students tend to stay with their parents after school and try to prolong their college lives. Because school is supposed to prepare one for the rest of his/her life and for whatever career, occupation, or profession he/she chooses, the word slack can appropriately describe the wasted time. Slackademic is used most frequently in the education community.
 
Slackademic applies to me on a few levels.
Etymology : From Middle English slak, from Old English sleac, from Old High German slah “slack,” from Latin laxus “slack, loose,” from languEre “to languish,” from Greek lagnos “lustful,” from Greek lEgein “to stop” + from Latin academia, from Greek AkadEmeia “gymnasium/school where Plato taught,” from AkadEmos “Attic mythological hero” + Latin -ic [adjective, noun]
Source : My roommate
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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