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Overworking class

noun; compounding
A segment of society in which the chief characteristic is the desire or need to work long hours Overworking class is a descriptive term for a combination of the working class and for overworking, which seems quite prevalent among businessmen and businesswomen today. The opposite is the underworking class, which is also very descriptive terminology. Using either of these terms specifies which branch of which one is talking, and the business community most frequently uses them.
 
Before too long, the idea of the “working class” will vanish and society will split into two camps: the overworking class —people with too much on their plate—and the underworking class—people with not enough to keep them bu
Etymology : From Middle English [adverb/preposition], from Old English ofer, from Old High German ubar “above/beyond/over,” from Latin super, from Greek hyper + from Middle English werk/work, from Old English werc/ weorc, from Old High German werc “work,” from Greek ergon, from Avestan var&zem “activity” + -ing + from French classe, from Latin classis “group called to military service, fleet, class,” from Latin calare “to call”
Source : My father
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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