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Ince

noun; clipping
an instance, an example ‘Ince’ is a clipping of the parent word ‘instance.’ Its use does not add any meaning to the type of instance; connotations rather apply to the speaker. The use of the word suggests the slang of gossipers—young, or those paying attention to socialites. As there is no need for a new word denoting an instance, it further seems that it is a shibboleth of sorts, relating to the two groups named above.
 
One gal who works the ladies' room at a more outdoorsy club down the street, for ince, was just bitchin' to me 'bout how cheap certain young starlets are.
Etymology : The parent word, ‘instance,’ came from Old French instance, instant, and Medieval Latin instantia, example, through the Middle English instaunce. The O.F. and M.L. parents both came from the Latin word for presence, instans.
Source : Yahoo gossip column
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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