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Huggle

noun; blending
an embrace that has the characteristics of both a hug and a snuggle; more than a hug but less than a snuggle An interesting blend, this word describes the action combining a hug and a snuggle—the two parent components. One quirk of the English language, that actually bares some resemblance to Yiddish (which makes sense, the two being Germanic derivates), is the many nearly-synonymous verbs describing degrees of an action. Yiddish has a variety of words describing a person being struck by a blow, English has many describing physically affectionate behavior. The creation of this word resulted from the specific degree displaying by a ‘huggle’ not being adequately conveyed by any of the other single-word forms in use. However, that there are many synonyms restricts the word to the young and the open-minded. Considered too ‘improper’ or ‘cute’ by many adults, it has not spread outside its limited original population.
 
I did spend some time with her and get some huggles though, so it's all good.
Etymology : Snuggle, a diminutive of one form of ‘snug,’ a verb entering English in 1583, was combined with ‘hug.’ The latter parent is thought to be of Scandinavian origin, specifically similar to the Old Norse hugga, to soothe. This, though, is uncertain.
Source : Xanga entry
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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