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YHBT

220; acronym
you have been trolled; you have lost The argument has also been put forward that the term came from ‘trolling for suckers,’ from sport fishing, and only became popular because of the second meaning of troll. Both etymologies may have had some part in the development of the noun. A ‘troll’ thus became similar to a flamer, with slightly different connotations. A ‘troll’ will seek attention, using inflammatory or controversial messages to disrupt other participants and ruin a conversation. Invariably, some angry participants developed vendettas against the ‘trolls;’ these became known as ‘troll-hunters.’ However, while responding to the trolls, they too help drive the conversations off-topic, and are thus not endeared to the rest of the users, who felt everyone had lost. Thus, the following phrase was commonly posted to those who ruined a conversation hunting trolls: ‘you have been trolled. You have lost. Have a nice day.’ In the way of the 1337, this was quickly abbreviated to YHBT. YHL. HAND. Clipping the rest of the phrase led to the acronym YHBT, which, still very much associated with the concept of losing, especially losing because of one’s own stupidity or lack of restraint, picked up the second, more generalized meaning. The word YHBT certainly has not left the computing community; it is certainly a shibboleth by which members can be recognized. It is more likely to be posted than vocalized, though the latter has occurred. It is most often used in condescending frustration.
 
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Etymology : The ever-popular acronym originated in the ‘1337’ world; that is, the argot of gamers. In this case, the etymology of one of the parent words, ‘troll,’ must first be known to understand the semantics behind the tetragrammaton. 'Troll’ itself, which first came to English in 1616 from the Norwegian troll and Danish trold from the Old Norse troll, meaning giant, first meant a ‘dwarf or giant in Scandinavian folklore.’ Note that the many homonyms for this word have no bearing.
Source : T-Shirt offered by Jinx.com
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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