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Englishy

adjective; derivation
Associated with the study of English or the humanities in general; majoring in English or the humanities; associated with mastery of the English language; literary. ('If I were more englishy, I would've done better on my paper') ENGLISHY points to more than just a direct association with the language, a mastery of the language, or the study of the language. It encompasses the entire category of areas of studies that involves extensive use of the English language. However, an ENGLISHY thing or person does not have to fit all of these roles. The observed use of ENGLISHY to describe someone who is proficient at the usage of language but does not necessarily study English, or even the humanities, is almost a case of metonymy. A good synonym would be "literary" when associated with the English language, i.e. a person proficient in the usage of French would not be considered ENGLISHY. There is a tendency within universities to categorize people as inclined toward the liberal arts or math and science. A wide stereotype surrounds those who belong to the former class. They are supposed to be grammatically correct, well read, and good at written composition. Also, they are thought to spend all their time on such activities. People inclined toward math and science wished for a word to describe all the literary folks, but none were available that were simplistic enough. "Literarily inclined" or even "literary" in themselves seem to, well, literary to fit the liking of the stereotypical calculator-toting math major. A new word was needed. To the casual observer, the most striking characteristic common to all such "literary" people is their mastery of spoken and written English, so ENGLISHY was born with the help of a common adjective ending. Eventually, ENGLISHY went beyond the division between majors, and also came to denote the characteristics of the stereotypical humanities major. Thus, a well read physics major can now also be ENGLISHY. ENGLISHY has two morphemes: the root ENGLISH and the suffix -Y. ENGLISH gives the main element that the meaning of ENGLISHY is centered around. The -Y makes ENGLISHY an adjective as well as supplies the component of the relationship of association between the root and the derivative.
 
I'm not an ENGLISHY person, so my writing is not so great.
Etymology : concatenation from the root ENGLISH and the adjective suffix -Y
Source : engineering major describing himself
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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