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wreck

verb; zero derivation
To destroy; To do very well at a particular task. Apparently, this term has more than one meaning. In the first case it means to get into trouble or to hurt oneself. In the other case it apparently means to perform very well at a particular task although it can also be thought of as destroying the competition or destroying the test by overcoming its difficulty. Wreck is already a verb in English, so this usage is apparently formed by zero derivation. In the first case, the word however takes on some of the connotation of the familiar verb wreck in that it connotes some awareness of a collision in which a person could get hurt, although it is a figurative collision.
 
You better check yourself before you wreck yourself. Man, I just wrecked that test.
Etymology : Zero Derivation.
Source : Conversation with Mother and Friend
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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