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Circuslike

adjective; compounding
1. resembling a circus in manner (rowdiness, craziness, etc.) 2. resembling a circus physically (animals, etc.) The word clearly means ‘resembling a circus’ in some manner. The root CIRCUS describes the extravagant event that we all know and love (with clowns!) and LIKE is another root that means ‘to resemble’. Thus, what it means is “like a circus” or “circus-like”. A concise and succinct way of describing something that resembles a circus in manner, dropping the hyphen in ‘circus-like’ for a blend for clarity and acknowledgement of its potency as a word.
 
Mr. Latourelle, a founder of the Cirque du Soleil who is taking an elaborate new equestrian-based circuslike extravaganza called "Cavalia" on tour, is a detail man who decided that since horses like grass, grass they shall have, even on a beach
Etymology : [from a compound of CIRCUS (noun) and LIKE (adj.)]
Source : New York Times article ‘The Stage Is Set: Enter Horses at Full Gallop’
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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