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Irony-drenched

adjective; compounding
to be drenched in irony, i.e. exhibit large amounts of literary irony (comical or not) Rather than say “contains a lot of literary irony” for the play, irony-drenched seems to be a most apt, concise and poignant way to get the message across. The use of the word DRENCH really hard hits the point that there is an abundance of irony. This clearly means to be exhibit large amounts of irony. It comes from a compounding of IRONY (‘the use of words to express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning’) and DRENCHED (past tense ‘to soak or immerse completely in’).
 
The quick-witted women know each other so well that they seem to speak in their own irony-drenched language.
Etymology : from a compound of IRONY and DRENCHED, derived from DRENCH
Source : New York Times during breakfast: ‘Sexual Tension Along the Jersey Shore’
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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