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ginormo

adjective; blending and clipping
marked by an extremely large or great size, number or extent
 
The adjective ‘gigantic,’ which has been clipped to ‘gi,’ and the adjective ‘enormous,’ which has been clipped to ‘normous,’ are blended together to form the adjective ‘ginormous.’ The combination of two adjectives that express large size into one term, perhaps accounts for why the adjectives ‘ginormous’ and ‘ginormo’ are often used to describe and emphasize the size of really extremely large entities, whose size may not be sufficiently accounted for by the use of only ‘enormous’ or ‘gigantic.’ The word ‘ginormous’ has been present in the English language for several years and recently further clipping has occurred, such that now the ‘us’ has been clipped from ‘ginormous’ to form ‘ginormo.’ There appears to be no difference in meaning between ‘ginormous’ and ‘ginormo.’
Etymology : Gigantic can be broken into the morphemes ‘giant,’ which comes from the Old French ‘geant’ that originates from the Latin ‘gigas’ meaning ‘giant’ and the adjective suffix ‘ic.’ ‘Enormous’ can be broken into the morphemes ‘ex-’ meaning ‘out of,’ ‘norm’ meaning ‘rule, norm’ and the adjective suffix ‘-ous’. Through the process of clipping, however, the ‘iant’ in the morpheme ‘giant’ and the ‘en’ and the ‘us’ in ‘enormous’ are not involved in the construction of the neologism.
Source : “This drink is ginormo!” (conversation with a friend, September 2008)
Last modified: 5 December 2008


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