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sluggage

noun; zero derivation
Extent or degree of a baseball player’s ability to hit a baseball with great power, usually resulting in a homerun. ("Babe Ruth was noted for his sluggage. He was always hitting homeruns.") Apparent Meaning: A baseball player’s skill and power as a batter in a baseball game, specifically for hitting homeruns. The verb root SLUG originally comes from the noun SLUG that refers to a small, snaillike gastropod. The shape of the SLUG creature lends to another meaning of SLUG, a round bullet somewhat larger than buckshot, which travels relatively slows as a slug creature does. The verb root SLUG found in SLUGGAGE refers to the act of shooting a SLUG from a gun. Although the shot may be relatively slow compared to other bullets, human actions that are likened to being shot from a gun must be very fast and powerful. Thus, the verb root SLUG in SLUGGAGE refers to the act of swinging the baseball bat very fast and forcefully, often resulting in homeruns. The ending –AGE forms the noun that suggests a measurable degree or quantifiable character to the verb SLUG. SLUGGAGE can be gauged by the number of homeruns hit by a player. The original SLUG that referred to a slow creature was ameliorated to a term that means fast and powerful swinging. Possible Reason Used: The term is used most frequently in baseball, in which a player who hits several homeruns is thought to demonstrate exemplary SLUGGAGE. It is a form of jargon used in baseball in reference to powerful batters. The term probably evolved from the round bullet SLUG, which is shot from a gun. Likening a player’s ability to hit a baseball to the act of shooting a gun is a metaphor that exaggerates and complements the player’s ability. Thus, the term was probably initially used to characterize a proficient baseball player as a SLUGGER. Then, the term SLUGGAGE came to refer to the batting ability of any baseball player, namely the ability to hit homeruns.
 
Lance Berkman had some serious sluggage in the World Series.
Etymology : zero derivation: verb root SLUG from noun ‘slug’, a round bullet; from noun ‘slug’ a small snaillike gastropod mollusk; from Middle English ‘slugge’, possibly from Scandinavian; -AGE noun ending suggests a quantifiable extent or degree
Source : Rice student talking about baseball game
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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