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Classitorium

noun; blending
A large classroom with theater seating and a centered stage area from which the lecturer instructs; a large lecture room with a maximum capacity of around 200 people or more.
 
This term is often used to refer to extremely large lecture halls where collegiate classes are held in a sarcastic or pejorative way. It is meant pejoratively because while the lecture room is utilized for classes, it more closely resembles an auditorium where speeches or performances are held, thus decreasing the amount of interaction between professors and students. This results in professors talking at students instead of to them, decreasing the level of academic value. This word was probably coined in a mocking manner to ridicule the ridiculous sizes that classrooms have become.
Etymology : A blend of the roots ‘classroom’ + ‘auditorium.’ ‘Classroom’ is a compound of the roots ‘class’ and ‘room.’ The root ‘class’ comes from Fr. ‘classe,’ which is one of the six orders into which Servius Tullius divided the Roman people. The sense in which ‘classe’ refers to schools and universities arose in 1656 and is from the notion of a form or lecture reserved to a certain level of scholars. The root ‘room’ comes from O.E. ‘rum’ which meant space. Therefore, the compound ‘classroom’ refers to a space for lectures reserved for scholars. Auditorium comes from L. ‘auditorium’ meaning lecture room, or the place where something is heard.
Source : Conversation with friend “I am looking to take courses with smaller class sizes because I am sick of having all of my classes in classitoriums” (06/2007)
Last modified: 3 December 2008


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