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Wall-jack

transitive verb; analogy
To steal someone’s Facebook account and write fraudulent wall posts on the Facebook walls of that person and his or her friends as well as changing that person’s personal information and status.
 
This is an analogy of the word ‘hijack’ or ‘carjack,’ which mean to steal a flying vehicle or car, respectively. In this case, instead of the root word in hijack, the root ‘wall’ is used instead, referring to the wall made popular by the networking website, Facebook. Unlike most walls, which are meant to provide structural integrity or privacy, the Facebook wall is meant to be written on. Thus, wall-jack is mostly used to refer to when an account has been maliciously misused to write libelous things against the owner of the account. This term is most prevalent among teenagers and college students familiar with the Facebook website. It was probably coined rather than using already made words because it formed an analogy with a well-known word.
Etymology : This term is an analogy of the words ‘hijack.’ ‘Hijack’ comes from Amer.Eng. ‘high’(way) + ‘jacker’ to mean ‘one who holds up, rob.’ In ‘wall-jack,’ ‘wall’ refers to the Facebook wall. ‘Wall’ comes from O.E. ‘weall,’ which means ‘rampart.’ It is also from L. ‘vallum’ meaning’ wall, rampart, row.’
Source : Conversation with a friend “She got wall-jacked yesterday when she left her laptop on in his room” (07/2007)
Last modified: 3 December 2008


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