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pocha

adjective;
Marked by the unconventional and disliked use of both English and Spanish words as in a blend of the two languages I believe "Pocha" was used because it perfectly describes a person who blends Spanish with English without having to say it in so many words. It is used however to express disapproval and find a way to criticize "the underclass" through prescriptive remarks. Since it is a direct borrowed word it cannot be considered or analyzed as much until it becomes more used by the U.S. population. Its slang/negative connotations make it an offensive term that should not be used to describe anyone for it will be taken as hurtful. I think the word "pocha" is most offensive even in Mexico because it is associated with people who don't have a strong background in either language and who may be seen as uneducated. In the U.S., Spanglish is used primarily by workers and is interpreted as the language of the uneducated as well. The term is mostly used by Mexican-Americans who can be considered middle to high in social class, yet the word is not something that would be said in a formal setting. In fact, the word is usually only used with family members and can be seen as a word used when in the gossipy mood.
 
That girl doesn’t speak good Spanish or English, she always talks pocha.
Etymology : loan word with no apparent recognizable morphemes. With affix 'a' in this case referring to a female because of Spanish grammar.
Source : Rice junior at a restaurant
Last modified: 10 June 2008


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