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leanover

noun; analogy compounding
a condition that occurs on the morning after a night of drinking and is characterized by a slight headache and weariness
 
This term is based on the analogical model 'hangover', which is a much more extreme case of a 'leanover' and usually involves vomiting and an intense headache. The analogy is valid since the term 'lean' is milder than the term 'hang'. This is because 'hang' implies being completely dependent on something else, while lean implies that one is only slightly supported by an external factor. 'Leanover' is fairly new to the English language, so it is not widespread, but it is mostly used by people who drink alcohol and party often. This word was probably coined by someone who was experiencing the effects of a 'leanover' and did not have any existing word that could describe them.
Etymology : compounding of lean [from Old English hleonian 'to bend, recline, lie down, rest' - from Proto-Indo-European base *kli- 'to lean, to incline'] and over [from Old English ofer - from Proto-Indo-European base *uper]
Source : "How is he feeling?" "He's just got a leanover. It's not to bad." (conversation between suitemates, September 2008)
Last modified: 4 December 2008


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