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Wordful

adjective Affixation
Full of words, wordy, effusive, long-winded. The adjective 'wordful', meaning "full of words", was coined from an affixation of the adjective suffix '-ful' to the noun 'word' as in the word 'meaningful', which was formed in a very similar way of a root noun and then the adjective ending meaning "full of (root)". The neologism can be used and was in fact probably created for use in more informal settings that would preclude the use of some of its synonyms like 'loquacious' (which can sound stuffy and pretentious) and can be used by a wide variety of people since it is rather uncontroversial and has no emphatic connotation. The term in the citation was used to question how productive the listener's day was, since they were in the process of writing a fairly long paper. The word can therefore obviously be used among students, but it does not have to be limited to them, and can expand to anyone who reads or writes a lot.
 
"Has your day been wordful?"
Etymology : Affixation: Root noun 'word' + adj ending '-ful'
Source : Student, Nov. 13, 2010
Last modified: 8 December 2010


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