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Keaton-esque

adjective Affixation
Similar in appearance, action or style to a work or actio of Buster Keaton. In the case of the citation, the term 'Keaton-esque', formed by affixation, was used to describe and illustrate the specific actions of characters in a play. The term was coined because it causes a very specific and descriptive image in the mind's eye of the reader, and so conveys an idea very clearly and very quickly without many words at all from the writer to his audience. It also gives the sentence a more educated or literary sound in that it utilizes an exotic-sounding term to draw a quick comparison and amusing comparison. The word was created from a proper name, Buster Keaton, which was a reference to a comic actor, and the adjective ending '-esque' meaning "reminiscent of (root)" from a word like 'statuesque', which has a strong similarity to 'Keaton-esque'. Both reference the qualities of some given person or thing.
 
"Well placed wooden beams allow the characters to climb from level to level and to make numerous Buster Keaton-esque foibles and falls."
Etymology : Affixation: Root proper name 'Keaton' + adj ending '-esque'
Source : "Insanity on in Noises Off" - Rice Thresher (newspaper) -Nov 12 edition
Last modified: 8 December 2010


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